Monday, October 19, 2009

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Call for papers for Advances in Tumor Virology from Dr Frank J Jenkins

Dear colleagues,

Our understanding of the role of viruses in tumor formation both in animals as well as humans has grown substantially over the last 10-20 years. Until now, there has not been a journal focused solely on the field of tumor virology. Advances in Tumor Virology (ATV) represents a unique, first of its kind journal that publishes articles relevant to all aspects of virus-induced carcinogenesis. ATV is an open access journal and therefore can reach a broad audience that is not restricted only to individuals or institutions with subscriptions.

The most difficult aspect of starting a new journal is getting scientists in the field to submit papers during the journal’s infancy. Even though the journal was started in August of 2009, within two months the journal’s web site has received over 6,200 hits. This is a testament to the need for ATV in cancer virology and demonstrates the interest of scientists all over the world in this journal. I encourage you to give serious consideration to submitting a paper to ATV. I know you will find the review process refreshing with each article reviewed by at least two knowledgeable experts in the field. I am absolutely convinced that as this journal proceeds, it will become a leading journal in this field.

What is the advantage to you of publishing in Advances in Tumor Virology?
  • Full open access: everyone can read your article and you retain copyright in it
  • Publishing decision within 2 weeks of submission
  • Your paper will not be rejected due to lack of space and will be published immediately on acceptance
  • Prompt and fair peer review from two expert peer reviewers
  • Frequent updates on your paper’s status
  • Friendly responsive staff
What a previous author said:
"The publishing process of this journal was a most pleasant and productive experience. I was particularly impressed with the regular updates of the progress of my submission. Many other journals receive a submission and authors may not hear anything for months. I appreciate your notification policy."
In summary:

The advantages of a younger journal such as Advances in Tumor Virology are numerous but in essence allow us a greater flexibility and responsiveness to authors and readers that older journals cannot match.

Next steps:


Yours sincerely,
Dr Frank J Jenkins

Editor-in-Chief
Advances in Tumor Virology



Call for papers for Health Services Insights from Dr Jarold Cosby

Dear colleagues,

By its very nature, health services research is multidisciplinary and complex, bridging research between many fields and applied settings. In fact, health services research is as often driven by problems in applied settings and issues with policy as it is by curiosity and theory. It is common to see a health services research project that includes disciplines as diverse as neurosurgery, anthropology, and geography. It is our objective to provide a home for timely, high quality insights into the myriad of health service issues faced around the world by policy makers, scientists, health practitioners, and the public.

There are major two strengths of this new journal; an integrative perspective of health services research, and an open access peer reviewed forum for synergistic information sharing that supports research and applied decision making.

Although many fields can benefit from sub-specialized journals emphasizing a few theories and methodologies, by its very nature health services research draws on disciplines spanning the social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, humanities, economics, and even business. Because the demand for scientific insights into the complex arena of health problems far outstrips the supply, Health Services Insights fills an important niche in research dissemination. By providing integrative insights into existing and newly arising health services problems, we hope to facilitate exciting advances in methodological and theoretical research. Health services research exists in a complex evolutionary environment that has been referred to as the ‘science of perpetual change’ (Haines, 1996). Researchers need timely information that is not hampered by traditional publication delays.

The second strength of Health Services Insights is the open access forum. Open access means that all articles are freely available to all, worldwide, and at no cost to the reader. As the Editor-in-Chief of this new, exciting journal, I heartily invite you to submit your research to us. With an outstanding selection of over 30 reviewers from around the world, we can provide quick, insightful feedback and rapid publication for high quality submissions. I sincerely look forward to seeing the many submissions to this journal, and hope to not only provide excellent science, but also provide important information that will help science be applied in real world settings.


What is the advantage to you of publishing in Health Services Insights?
  • Full open access: everyone can read your article and you retain copyright in it

  • Publishing decision within 2 weeks of submission

  • Your paper will not be rejected due to lack of space and will be published immediately on acceptance

  • Prompt and fair peer review from two expert peer reviewers

  • Frequent updates on your paper’s status

  • Friendly responsive staff
Aims and scope:

Health services research draws on disciplines spanning the social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, and humanities. Because the demand for scientific insights into health problems far outstrips the supply, Health Services Insights provides an integrative perspective of health services research and a forum for synergistic information sharing that supports research and applied decision making.

What a previous author said:
"The publishing process of this journal was a most pleasant and productive experience. I was particularly impressed with the regular updates of the progress of my submission. Many other journals receive a submission and authors may not hear anything for months. I appreciate your notification policy."
In summary:

The advantages of a younger journal such as Health Services Insights are numerous but in essence allow us a greater flexibility and responsiveness to authors and readers that older journals cannot match.

Next steps:


Yours sincerely,
Dr Jarold Cosby

Editor-in-Chief
Health Services Insights

International Journal of Insect Science indexed by CABI

I'm pleased to announce that International Journal of Insect Science is now indexed by CABI.

IJIS is a recently launched journal which has been generating considerable interest amongst readers. Of the three papers published to date all have been read by more than 300 readers.

The most widely-read article has been read over 500 times.

Interview with Biomarker Insights editorial board member Dr Paul Lampe

This interview is with Biomarker Insights editorial board member Dr Paul Lampe. Biomarker Insights is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica.

Editor in Chief Dr Stephen F Kingsmore has recently issued a call for papers.

What is the primary focus of your work and main areas of expertise?

Early detection and diagnostic cancer-related biomarkers.

What are the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in your area?

Proteomics using large format protein arrays - antibody, recombinant antibody, tissue lysate or proteome arrays.

Who are your main formal and informal collaborators and/or networks? Please describe your work with them.

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center facilitates extensive interactions between laboratory scientists, clinicians, epidemiologists and biostatisticians and we collaborate with several networks including the Early Detection Research Network (NCI-NIH) and the Women's Health Initiative (NHLBI/NIH) to name a few.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

My laboratory investigates the control of cell growth both at the cell biological/ mechanistic level and through cancer biomarker discovery. Our interest in gap junctions as potential biomarkers of cancer and, more recently, the advent of new screening methodologies has expanded our efforts into broad proteomic screens for potential cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry and recombinant/full length antibody array technologies.

What do you think about the development of open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal? What motivated you to do so?

Given pressures from funding sources, budget restrictions, and endorsements from many of the world's leading scientists, open access publishing seems destined to continue to grow.

What articles and/or books have you published recently?

Recent Biomarker related articles:
  1. McTiernan, A., Yasui, Y., Sorensen, B., Irwin, M.L., Morgan, A., Rudolph, R.E. Surawicz, C., Lampe, J.W. Ayub, K., Potter, J.D., Lampe, P.D. “Effect of a 12-month exercise intervention on patterns of cellular proliferation in colonic crypts: a randomized controlled trial” (2006) Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 15, 1588-1597.
  2. Gafken, P.R., Lampe, P.D. “Methodologies for Characterizing Phosphoproteins by Mass Spectrometry” (2006) Cell Commun. Adhes. 13, 249-262.
  3. McTiernan, A., Sorensen, B., Irwin, M.L., Morgan, A., Yasui, Y., Rudolph, R.E., Surawicz, C., Lampe, J.W., Lampe, P.D., Ayub, K., Potter, J.D. “Exercise effect on weight and body fat in men and women” (2007) Obesity, 15, 1496-512.
  4. Campbell, K.L, McTiernan, A., Li, S.S, Sorensen, B.E, Yasui, Y., Lampe, J.W, King, I.B., Ulrich, C.M, Rudolph, R.E., Irwin, M.L., Surawicz, C., Ayub, K., Potter, J.D., Lampe, P.D. Effect of a 12-month exercise intervention on Bax, Bcl-2 and apoptosis in colon crypts: A randomized controlled trial. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev, 16,1767-74.
  5. Abrahamson PE, King IB, Ulrich CM, Rudolph RE, Irwin M.L., Yasui Y., Surawicz C., Lampe J.W., Lampe P.D., Morgan A, Sorensen BE, Ayub K, Potter JD, McTiernan A. No effect of exercise on colon mucosal prostaglandin concentrations: a 12-month randomized controlled trial. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 16, 2351-6 6.
  6. Loch, C.M., Ramirez, A.B., Liu, Y., Sather, C.L., Delrow, J.J., Scholler, N., Garvik, B.M., Urban, N.D., McIntosh, M.W., and Lampe, P.D. “Use of High Density Antibody Arrays to Validate and Discover Cancer Serum Biomarkers.” (2007) Molecular Oncology, 1, 313-320.
  7. Adewale, A. Liu, Q., Dinu, I., Lampe, P.D. , Mitchell, B.L., Yasui, Y. “A Cautionary Note on the Evaluation of Biomarkers of Subtypes of a Single Disease” (2008) Amer. J. Epidemiol. 68(6), 559-62.
  8. Scholler, N., Gross, J.A., Garvik, B., Wells, L., Liu, Y., Loch, C.M., Ramirez, A.B., McIntosh, M.M., Lampe, P.D., Urban, N. Use of cancer-specific yeast-secreted in vivo biotinylated recombinant antibodies for serum biomarker discovery” (2008) J Transl. Med. 6, 41.
Further information about Dr Lampe:


Perspectives in Medicinal Chemistry now indexed by Pubmed

I'm pleased to announce that Perspectives in Medicinal Chemistry is now indexed by Pubmed.

PMC is a unique journal with enormous future potential. Focusing on medicinal chemistry, it aims to facilitate communication between researchers working in this area without giving rise to problems with disclosure of proprietary information.

This is combined with fast, high-quality peer review by senior researchers. The open access model allows unparalleled article visibility. The journal website is designed to achieve high search engine visibility for articles. Articles in PMC achieve between 500 to 2000+ views.

Perspectives in Medicinal Chemistry is indexed by:
  • Pubmed
  • Pubmed Central
  • Embase
  • Google Scholar
  • CAS
  • DOAJ
  • OAIster

Gene Regulation and Systems Biology now indexed by Pubmed

I'm pleased to announce that Gene Regulation and Systems Biology is now indexed by Pubmed.

GRSB is now an even better destination for your research. In addition to fast, high quality peer review by highly-qualified professionals, your work now achieves even greater visibility.

This article, by Noboru Uchide and Hiroo Toyoda, has been read 8,438 times since being published in GRSB in November 2007!

Gene Regulation and Systems Biology is indexed by:
  • Pubmed
  • Pubmed Central
  • Embase
  • Embiology
  • Google Scholar
  • CAS
  • DOAJ
  • Intute
  • OAIster

Monday, October 12, 2009

Interview with Clinical Medicine: Cardiology editorial board member Dr Francisco R. Breijo-Márquez

This interview is with Clinical Medicine: Cardiology editorial board member Dr Francisco R. Breijo-Márquez. Clinical Medicine: Cardiology is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica.

Editor in Chief Dr Martin LeWinter has recently issued a call for papers.


What is the primary focus of your work and main areas of expertise?

For 20 years, I have been a specialist in Cardiology from the School of Medicine in Boston. (Massachusetts). Approximately 15 years ago I earned the position of Titular Professor of Cardiology in Hartford. (Connecticut). Nowadays I am working as Chief of Department of Cardiology between Spain (Murcia) and the United States of America.

What are the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in your area?

The most exciting thing for me nowadays is the study of the electrical cardiac systole. Our line of investigation, at the moment, is the study of the relation that can exist between ion lithium levels in blood and the rhythm disturbances over the same one.

Who are your main formal and informal collaborators and/or networks? Please describe your work with them.

Professors Pardo Ríos and Alcaraz are my more intimate collaborators in the Faculty of Medicine of Murcia (Spain). Both were also collaborators in United States.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

Our line of current work is the research on the electrical cardiac systole. We have already published some new research about this in British Medical Journal, International Journal of Cardiology, and Heart & Rhythm.

What do you think about the development of open access publishing?

I think now and I'll think always that this way is the best way for to learn about any matter.

What articles and/or books have you published recently?
  • Decrease of electrical cardiac systole. (Int J Cardiol) [Pubmed]

  • Variability and diversity of electrical cardiac systole. (B.M.J)
Further information about Dr Breijo-Márquez:

Friday, October 9, 2009

Research profile on Clinical Medicine: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders editorial board member Dr Axel Finckh

This research profile is on Clinical Medicine: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders editorial board member Dr Axel Finckh. Clinical Medicine: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica.

Editor in Chief Dr Tariq Haqqi has recently issued a call for papers.

Primary research focus:

Epidemiology Clinical Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis

Most notable developments in this area:
  • Identification of Gene-Environnement interaction as a risk factor for the development of RA (Shared Epitope with Tabacco smoking)
  • Identification of ACPA positive RA as a clinically meaningfull subgroup of RA
  • Identification of first factors that help clinicians to select patients most likely to respond well to specific biologic agent in RA: (i.e. early polyarthritis responding to MTX mainly if ACPA positive, Rituximab more likely to have a favorable response to seropositive (RF or ACPA) RA patients, or to patients that have a history of anti-TNF inadequate response,...)
Collaborators:
  • Cem Gabay: Mentor
  • Matt Liang: Mentor
  • Karen Costenbader: colleague epidemiologist
  • Jean Dudler: colleague and fellow clinical researcher
Reason for working in this area:

By working with and for the Swiss RA registry (SCQM-RA)

View of open access publishing:

Positive, because of fast publication turnover and less administrative burden

Recent publications:
  • Finckh A, Ciurea A, Brulhart L, Moeller B, Walker UA, Courvoisier D, Kyburz D, Gabay C, SCQM-RA. Which Subgroup of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Benefit Most From Switching to Rituximab Versus Alternative Anti-TNF Agents After Previous Failure to Anti-TNF Agent? Annals Rheum Dis. 2009 May 4 (Epub ahead of print)
  • Finckh A, Dehler S, Gabay C, on behalf of the SCQM physicians. The Effectiveness of Leflunomide as Co-Therapy of TNF inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Population Based Study Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Jan;68(1):33-9
  • Martin-du-Pan SMC, Dehler S., Gabay C, and Finckh A on behalf of the physicians of the SCQM. Comparison of Drug Retention Rates and Causes of Drug Discontinuation Between Anti-TNF Agents in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients. Arthritis Rheum. (AC&R) 2009 Vol 61(5):560-568
  • G. Palmer, D. Talbot-Ayer, C. Lamacchia, D. Toy, C.A. Seemayer, S. Viatte, A. Finckh, S. Smith, C. Gabay. Inhibition of IL-33 signaling attenuates the severity of experimental arthritis. Arthritis and Rheumatism 2009; Vol. 60, No. 3, March 2009, pp 738–749
  • Lübbeke A, Duc S, Garavaglia, Finckh A, and Hoffmeyer. Body mass index and severity of clinical and radiographic signs of osteoarthritis in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Obesity 2009 Feb 5. [Epub ahead of print]
Further information about Dr Finckh:

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Interview with Clinical Medicine: Oncology editorial board member Dr Daniela Bota

This interview is with Clinical Medicine: Oncology editorial board member Dr Daniela Bota. Clinical Medicine: Oncology is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica. Editor in Chief Dr William C S Cho has recently issued a call for papers.

What is the primary focus of your work and main areas of expertise?

The primary focus of my research is the biology of malignant glioma. My laboratory focuses on describing the characteristics of brain tumor stem cells, with the goal of finding specific therapies targeting that very aggressive cell population.

What are the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in your area?

The discovery that tumor growth and resistance to treatment is mainly related to the presence of the tumor stem/initiating cells.

Who are your main formal and informal collaborators and/or networks? Please describe your work with them.

I work with experts from many different fields, including clinical neuro-oncology, neuroscience and molecular imaging. Today's discoveries require a large team, and I am very fortunate to work in a research academic center such as University of California, Irvine.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

I am a clinician treating patients with brain tumor, and I am very aware of the limitations of the current treatment paradigms, which minimally improve patient's outcome. This motivated me to search for novel treatments, in the hope of improving patient's survival and quality of life.

What do you think about the development of open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal? What motivated you to do so?

I am very appreciative of open access publishing. As I attended medical school in a country where medical information was hard to access, I have come to realize that open access will improve the quality of information available to all researchers in the world.

What articles and/or books have you published recently?
  • Rima Dafer and Daniela A. Bota. Acute Methotrexate Neurotoxicity with Choreiform Movements and Local Neurological Deficits: A Case Report. Southern Medical Journal September 2009. [Pubmed]

  • Bota DA, Friedman HS. Interstitial chemotherapy with biodegradable BCNU (GliadelR) wafers in the treatment of malignant gliomas. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 3(5):707-715, 2007. [Pubmed]
Further information about Dr Bota:


Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Interview with International Journal of Pain editorial board member Dr Raymond Tait

This interview is with International Journal of Pain editorial board member Dr Raymond Tait. International Journal of Pain is a new open access journal recently launched by Libertas Academica.

Editor in Chief Dr David Fishbain has recently issued a call for papers.


What is the primary focus of your research?

My research has focused on pain assessment and clinical decision-making. With my colleagues, we have developed instruments to assess pain distribution, pain-related disability, and, most recently, a preliminary instrument to evaluate how people cope with cancer pain. Our decision-making research treats clinical pain evaluation and care as a social psychological process driven, in large part, by the subjective nature of chronic pain and the frequent lack of objective diagnostic evidence. Consequently, clinical judgments are influenced by a range of factors, including characteristics of a patient, characteristics of a provider, and features of the situation within which clinical care is provided.

What are the most exciting developments arising from current research in your area?

We have done considerable work looking at racial/ethnic disparities in treatment, focusing on patients involved in the workers' compensation because the availability of insurance is a constant in that cohort. That work has shown both race/ethnicity and SES to predict differences in treatment and outcomes. More recently, we looked at long-term outcomes in this patient cohort and found that SES became the more predominant driver of outcomes. Aside from pain disparities, we have looked at the assessment of pain in persons with moderate and advanced dementia, such that they are incapable of valid pain reports. We are trying to identify a protocol that will flag people for whom pain interferes significantly with function so that pain treatment can be provided to them (and the effects of that treatment evaluated, too).

Who are your main collaborators? Please describe your work with them.

My chief collaborator has been John Chibnall, PhD. He and I have collaborated on many of the projects described above and continue to work on a theoretical model that can be applied to clinical judgments in pain. I have collaborated with Carmen Green, MD, on some of our work on racial/ethnic disparities. In the disability arena, we have worked with Elena Andresen, PhD, an epidemiologist now working at the University of Florida, and Nortin Hadler, MD, a rheumatologist at the University of North Carolina. In our recent work on pain in dementia, we are collaborating with Keela Herr, RN, PhD, from the University of Iowa.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

I initially was drawn to work in the pain field by dint of a clinical exposure that I had at the University of Virginia. With encouragement from Doug DeGood, PhD, I did a post-doctoral fellowship there, and then I moved to Saint Louis University to start a combined inpatient/outpatient pain management program. Research was integrated into the clinical service and gradually consumed more of my time and attention until, with support from grant funding, I moved away from clinical service into research and research administration.
What do you think about the development of open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal? What motivated you to do so?

While I have yet to publish in an open access journal, it is a development that I view very positively. The format promises easy access to readers and researchers, not limited by subscriptions, access to libraries, etc. I presently am working on an article that I expect to submit to the International Journal of Pain within the next few months.

What articles and/or books have you published recently?

Some of our (relatively) recent articles:
  • Chibnall JT, Tait RC, Andresen EM, & Hadler NM. Race differences in diagnosis and surgery for occupational low back injuries. Spine 2006;31:1272-1275. [Pubmed]
  • Tait RC, Chibnall JT, Andresen EA, & Hadler NM. Disability determination: validity with occupational low back pain. Journal of Pain 2006;6:951-957. [Pubmed]
  • Hadler NM, Tait RC, & Chibnall JT. Back pain in the workplace. Journal of the American Medical Association 2007;297:1594-1596.
  • Andresen EM, Machuga CR, Van Booven ME, Egel, J, Chibnall JT, & Tait, RC. Effects and costs of tracing strategies on nonresponse bias in a survey of workers with low-back injury. Public Opinion Quarterly 2008;72:40-54.
  • Tait RC, Chibnall JT, Kalauokalani DC. Provider judgments of patients in pain: seeking symptom certainty. Pain Medicine 2009;10:11-34. [Pubmed]
  • Tait RC. Vulnerability in clinical research with patients in pain: a risk analysis. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 2009;Spring:59-72. [Pubmed]
Some recent book chapters:
  • Tait, R.C. (2006). Ethical considerations in the assessment and treatment of chronic pain in older adults. In M.E. Schatman (Ed.), Ethical Issues in Chronic Pain Management. New York: Informa Healthcare, 79-94. [Amazon]
  • Tait, R.C. & Miller L. (2007). The multidisciplinary treatment of pain in vulnerable populations. In M.E. Schatman (Ed.) and A. Campbell (Eds.), Chronic Pain Management: A Guidebook for Multidisciplinary Program Development. New York: Informa Healthcare, 129-150.
  • Tait, R.C. & Figoora, V. (in press). Disability management in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. In W.H. McCarberg and D.J. Clauw (Eds.), Fibromyalgia. New York: Informa Healthcare.
  • Robinson, J.P. & Tait, R.C. (in press). Disability evaluation in painful conditions. In J.D. Loeser, S.H. Butler, C.R. Chapman, and D.C. Turk (Eds.), Bonica’s Management of Pain, 4th Edition. [Amazon]
Further information about Dr Tait:

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Interview with Evolutionary Bioinformatics editorial board member Dr John Hancock

This interview is with Evolutionary Bioinformatics editorial board member Dr John Hancock. Evolutionary Bioinformatics is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica.

Editor in Chief Dr Dennis Wall has recently issued a call for papers.


What is the primary focus of your work and main areas of expertise?

I run a bioinformatics group at MRC Harwell, which is a major international centre in mouse genetics. My background is in molecular evolution, particularly the evolution of repetitive (simple) sequences and since 1993 I have had a strong interest in amino acid repeats in proteins. My current group also has a wider remit. We are very interested in the collection, dissemination and representation (using ontologies) of phenotype data and in the relationship between genotype and phenotype which we address using both sequence analysis techniques and systems modelling.

What are the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in your area?

Our work on amino acid repeats has recently shown that these repeats tend very strongly to occur in unstructured regions of proteins. This is a novel insight into the context in which amino acid repeats evolve and brings together the two areas of repeat and unstructured region evolution. The two other major bioinformatics challenges I'm involved in are the sharing of phenotype data and the application of Next-Generation Sequencing in mouse genetics. We are now in an exciting phase in which we establish the basic technology for sharing phenotype data between laboratories internationally. This is as much a political and sociological issue as a technical one but we believe it will provide a very powerful resource if we can succeed. Next-Generation Sequencing provides with a major computational challenges, partly from the infrastructure we require to establish pipelines, but it also provides us with exciting!
opportunities to develop new areas of analysis.

Who are your main formal and informal collaborators and/or networks? Please describe your work with them.

I am a member of a number of international collaborations. Many of these are funded by the European Commission, such as CASIMIR, which deals with interoperability and sustainability of mouse databases, EUMODIC, which is a large project to phenotype knockout mouse models, and ENFIN, which is a systems biology collaborative project. I also lead a transcontinental discussion group on phenotype data sharing, Interphenome, and am involved in the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

I first got into molecular evolution when I moved to Gabriel Dover's lab in Cambridge in the mid-80s. I had been working on the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structure and in Gabby's lab I started working on the evolution of ribosomal RNA sequence and structure. This led eventually to an interest in repeats in proteins as these were the only ones that appeared to have the potential for having any effect on phenotype. Having an interest in comutational methods and applications has led to me being tagged as a "bioinformatician" and has led to interesting opportunities to work in disparate ares in the last few years.

What do you think about the development of open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal? What motivated you to do so?

One of the main conclusions of our discussions in CASIMIR has been the conclusion that we should be working towards a "scientific commons" in which information should flow as freely as possible. I am therefore strongly in favour of open access publishing. The MRC, who pay my salary, insist that all papers published by them should be freely accessible within six months of publication but I would support this initiative irrespective of who paid me!

What articles and/or books have you published recently?
  • Simon, M. & Hancock, J.M.. (2009) Tandem and cryptic amino acid repeats accumulate in disordered regions of proteins. Genome Biol. 10(6): R59 [Pubmed]
  • Beck, T., Morgan, H., Blake, A., Wells, S., Hancock, J.M. & Mallon, A.-M. (2009) Practical application of ontologies to annotate and analyse large scale raw mouse phenotype data. BMC Bioinformatics 10(Suppl 5): S2 [Pubmed]
  • Smedley, D., Swertz, M.A., Wolstencroft, K., Proctor, G., Zouberakis, M., Bard, J., Hancock, J.M., Schofield, P. (2008) Solutions for data integration in functional genomics: a critical assessment and case study. Briefings in Bioinformatics 9(6): 532-544. [Pubmed]
  • Hancock, J.M. & Mallon, A.-M. (2007) Phenobabelomics: Mouse phenotype data resources. Brief Funct Genomic Proteomic 6: 292-301. [Pubmed]
  • Mallon, A.-M, Blake, A. & Hancock, J.M. (2008) EuroPhenome and EMPReSS: online mouse phenotyping resource. Nucleic Acids Res. 36 (Database Issue): D715-D718. [Pubmed]
  • Jiang, N., Cox, R.D. & Hancock, J.M.. (2007) A kinetic core model of the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion network of pancreatic β-cells. Mamm. Genome 18(6-7): 508-520. [Pubmed]
  • Hancock, J.M. et al. (The Mouse Phenotype Database Integration Consortium) (2007) Integration of mouse phenome data resources. Mamm. Genome 18(3): 157-163. [Pubmed]
Further information about Dr Hancock:


Monday, October 5, 2009

Interview with Clinical Medicine: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine editorial board member Dr Lee Morrow

This interview is with Clinical Medicine: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine editorial board member Dr Lee Morrow.

Clinical Medicine: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine is an open access journal published by Libertas Academica.
Editor in Chief

Dr Hussein D Foda has recently issued a call for papers.


What is the primary focus of your work and main areas of expertise?

My primary areas of interest include nosocomial infections - particularly pneumonia - and intensive care unit outcomes. My clinical research team is presently focusing its efforts on novel methods of preventing preventing ICU-acquired infections. We are currently examining the roles of probiotics in preventing infectious complications of intensive care.

What are the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in your area?

This is an area of active clinical investigation given recent trends in antimicrobial resistance and the lack of new antimicrobial compounds in the pharmaceutical industry pipeline. Because nosocomial infection rates are increasingly being used as a measure of "quality of care", this is an area of significant scrutiny by patients, hospitals and insurers.

Who are your main formal and informal collaborators and/or networks? Please describe your work with them.

I continue to collaborate with Dr. Marin Kollef at Washington University and Dr. Tom Casale at Creighton University. Our collective efforts are investigating not only the clinical applications of probiotics in the ICU, but also the effects of these agents on the immune system of critically ill patients.

How did you come to be working in your research area?

My unique clinical interests combined with the expertise of my mentors and collaborators has led to my current avenue of study. However, we are always interested in pursuing innovative collaborations that could translate into novel therapies.

What do you think about the development of open access publishing? Have you published in an open access journal? What motivated you to do so?

Open access publishing provides several benefits to the scientific community. Most importantly it increases access to scholarly work, thereby increasing the impact of authors' works. The increased speed with which manuscripts are reviewed and published increases the efficiency of the research process. In my personal experience, the more informal feel of open access publishing promotes academic exchange between the author and the audience.

What articles and/or books have you published recently?
  • Morrow LE, Kollef M. Recognition and Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia in the ICU and Infection Control in Mechanical Ventilation. Intensive Care Medicine. 2009; Accepted and in press.
  • Morrow LE, Kollef MH. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia. In: Jong E, Stevens D. Netter’s Infectious Diseases. New York: Elsevier. 2009.
  • Hilleman DE, Malesker MA, Morrow LE, Schuller D. A Systematic Review of the Cardiovascular Risk of Inhaled Anticholinergics in Patients with COPD. International Journal of COPD. 2009;4:253-263.
  • Morrow LE. Probiotics in the Intensive Care Unit. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2009;15:144-148.
  • Baughman RP, Morrow LE. Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Nosocomial Pneumonias. Handbooks in Health Care Co. Newtown, Pennsylvania. 2009.
  • Morrow LE. Prevention Strategies for Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia. Semin Resp Crit Care Med. 2009;30:86-91.
  • Kollef M, Morrow LE, Baughman RP, et al. Health Care-Associated Pneumonia (HCAP): A Critical Appraisal to Improve Identification, Management and Outcomes – Proceedings of the HCAP Summit. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2008;46:S296-334.
  • Morrow LE, Shorr AF. The Seven Deadly Sins of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia. Chest. 2008;134:225-6.
  • Morrow LE, Kollef MH. Probiotics in the Intensive Care Unit: Why Controversies and Confusion Abound. Critical Care. 2008;12:160.
Further information about Dr Morrow:


Thursday, October 1, 2009

Announcing Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology

I'm pleased to announce that Libertas Academica will soon commence development on a new open access journal, Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology.

In his forthcoming introductory editorial, the Editor in Chief, Dr Kayvan Najarian writes:
I am pleased to announce the launch of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology – a new peer reviewed open access journal published by Libertas Academica. Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology will be the leading forum covering a very wide range of topics in biomedical engineering, bioinformatics, systems biology, and computational biology, in particular papers using computational methods to address complex problems in today’s medicine and biology. Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology will be a forum to form a bridge across experimental research and mathematical modelling. This interdisciplinary journal is intended to provide further communications among researchers using computational methods in biology. The journal’s main areas of research will include:
  • Computational Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Bioinformatics
  • Systems Biology
  • Biology-inspired Computational Methods
  • Mathematical Modelling,
  • Medical and Biological Databases
  • Computer-Aided Decision Making
  • Biomedical Imaging
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biomedical Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Image Processing
  • Physiological Modeling
  • Medical Informatics
Expressions of interest in joining the Editorial Board are welcomed. Applicants should complete this form.