Friday, March 20, 2015

Published This Week (16th March - 20th March)

We are pleased to announce the publication of the following peer reviewed papers. Sign up to receive email alerts to receive immediate notification of new papers.

Air, Soil and Water Research
Evaluation of Sorption Coefficients for Pyroxasulfone, s-Metolachlor, and Dimethenamid-p

Cancer Informatics
Case-Based Retrieval Framework for Gene Expression Data

GeneMed: An Informatics Hub for the Coordination of Next-Generation Sequencing Studies that Support Precision Oncology Clinical Trials

Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology
A Propensity Score-Matching Analysis of Transthoracic Echocardiography and Abdominal Ultrasonography for the Detection of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports
Shoulder Pad Sign and Asymptomatic Hypercalcemia in a Patient with End-Stage Kidney Disease

Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology
Effect of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene on the Proliferative Activity of the Breast Epithelium in Premenopausal Women

Clinical Medicine Insights: Women's Health
Do Premenopausal Hypothyroid Women on Levothyroxine Therapy Need Bone Status Monitoring?

Environmental Health Insights
Reduced Efficacy of Commercial Acaricides Against Populations of Resistant Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus microplus from Two Municipalities of Antioquia, Colombia

Evolutionary Bioinformatics
A RESTful API for Access to Phylogenetic Tools via the CIPRES Science Gateway

Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
A Simulated Clinical Skills Scenario to Teach Interprofessional Teamwork to Health Profession Students

Perspectives in Medicinal Chemistry
Selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Antibacterials

Dr Messer discusses language changes during aging

This author interview is by Dr Rachel Messer, of Oklahoma State University. Dr Messer's full paper, Pragmatic language changes during normal aging: Implications for health care and quality of life, is available for download in Healthy Aging & Clinical Care in the Elderly.

Please summarise for readers the content of your article.
The article discusses some proposed mechanisms behind language changes in non-pathologically aging adults, and how these changes in older patients may affect communication with health care providers. The main area of language change during aging that is discussed in the article is pragmatic language, which is the social use of language. Pragmatic language skills include verbal (e.g., appropriate turn-taking in conversation), nonverbal (e.g., proper eye contact), and paralinguistic (e.g., appropriate syllable stress and intonation) aspects. Pragmatic language skills also include the ability to use and comprehend figurative language, such as metaphor, humour, and sarcasm.
Language functions tend to be largely lateralized to the left cerebral hemisphere, including analytical processing of words in sentences and planning and production of speech sounds. However, some language functions have shown to be more centralized in the right cerebral hemisphere, such as synthesis of verbal and nonverbal information and the aspects of pragmatic language described above. The two hemispheres are joined by the corpus callosum, which enables transmission of linguistic and other information between the two hemispheres.

As the brain ages, many adults report changes to their memory, visual and auditory senses, and other cognitive areas. Pragmatic language skills have been shown to decline during aging as well, with declines in the ability to comprehend emotional speech and facial expression, difficulty monitoring turn-taking during conversation, increased difficulty comprehending figurative language, and decreased use and comprehension of gestures during conversation. As older adults tend to have higher incidences of injury and illness than younger adults, their relationships with health care providers are more frequent and are important to health maintenance and medical plan adherence. Aspects of pragmatic language decline affect social interaction, and may be particularly detrimental to health if they occur at high frequency in the context of communication with health care providers. As the number of older adults in the population continues to increase in the next few decades, health care providers, older adults, and their families should be made aware of how pragmatic language decline can affect health care and social interaction overall.

How did you come to be involved in your area of study?
My area of training is in Developmental Psychology, with an emphasis in cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics, and I have maintained a consistent interest in pragmatic language since my early graduate career. I became interested in the relationship between pragmatic language and health after experiencing health care scenarios with older family members in which they experienced high levels of frustration and misunderstanding with health care providers. I began to think about the factors that go into language and social interaction in the patient-provider relationship and became more interested in determining how those factors can affect health. I am currently collecting data regarding the relationship between older adults' pragmatic language skills and their physical and mental health.

What was previously known about the topic of your article?
Definition of pragmatic language skills has been established for several decades. Pragmatic language declines during aging have been well-researched, along with specific disorders in which pragmatic language deficits commonly occur (e.g., autism). A small number of articles have investigated how pragmatic language declines during aging can translate into pragmatic issues in health care settings.

How has your work in this area advanced understanding of the topic?
My work has brought to light a more direct relationship that may be occurring between older patients' pragmatic language decline and their social communication with health care providers. I have also introduced some ideas for future interventions for older adults, their families, and health care providers so that some direct measures may be taken to avoid disruption in transmission of health information.

What do you regard as being the most important aspect of the results reported in the article?
The table presented at the end of the article should act as a short example guide for providers. Some tips on what to avoid linguistically and socially when working with older adults who may be experiencing pragmatic language decline may be a valuable first step to future interventions and training for providers.

Dr Mark Miller on Phylogenetic Tools

This author interview is by Dr Mark Miller, of University of California’s San Diego Supercomputer Center.  Dr Miller's full paper, A RESTful API for access to phylogenetic tools via the CIPRES Science Gateway, is available for download in Evolutionary Bioinformatics.

First please summarise for readers the content of your article
Getting access to large computing resources is key for a lot of modern phylogenetics research. Our goal is to make this access ever easier for scientists. Our original CIPRES service allows researchers to run parallel codes for sequence alignment and tree inference on a set of large compute clusters in the US. Access was provided through a web browser. Sometimes a web browser is perfect for submitting jobs, but sometimes it is tedious and interruptive. The article describes a new CIPRES web service that allows scientists to submit the same sorts of jobs outside of a browser interface.  The importance of this is two-fold.  First, anyone who knows a scripting language can now run jobs from their desktop /laptop computer. If one wanted to submit 50 jobs at once, it is now possible without clicking 50 create job buttons, and 50 submit buttons. Second, there are a lot of highly sophisticated desktop applications out there, but they can only use whatever compute power is available where they are installed. Sequence alignment and tree inference are very compute-intensive now, and take forever to complete in desktop environments. With our new web services, desktop applications run locally, but when a sequence alignment or tree inference analysis is needed, they are sent off to run on supercomputers at SDSC. The user never needs to be aware that the jobs are running elsewhere, the results come much faster, and they arrive in the work environment where they can be easily analysed.

How did you come to be involved in your area of study?
I have a PhD in Biochemistry. One day in 2000, I drove up to a Wendy's and saw a young woman taking orders on a tablet computer. I thought how much better life would be for Biologists if they had tools like that to enter their data. And that began my interest in building IT tools that help biologists get their work done.  

What was previously known about the topic of your article?
The technologies for web services have been with us for more than a decade, and their implementation in service of Biologists dates back nearly as far.  The growth in popularity of web services has recently skyrocketed, and it directly parallels the explosion of interest in mobile apps, which have web services at their core.  The basic premise of these apps is using web services to bring lots of remote compute power to a tiny device for display. Our goal is exactly the same. In our case, the work represents the first publicly accessible implementation of those technologies for the phylogenetics community.

How has your work in this area advanced understanding of the topic?
Our work opens the door to new ways of using technology in service of Phylogenetic research. What we know already is that we have increased the power of users to compute trees and sequence alignments in several web sites, and soon we expect the same will be true for several desktop applications.  We look forward to seeing how wide the adoption is, and in how many new ways these services will be adapted in new software projects.

What do you regard as being the most important aspect of the results reported in the article?
The most important thing is opening up access to high performance cluster computing to a wide audience of development-savvy computational biologists. They are now free to incorporate and adapt these services in new and creative ways to enable a new generation of phylogenetics software. It is possible now to create tools for the desktop that reach out for supercomputing power when it is required, while still providing the convenience, flexibility, and dynamic interface capabilities of a desktop app.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Published This Week (9th March - 13th March)

We are pleased to announce the publication of the following peer reviewed papers. Sign up to receive email alerts to receive immediate notification of new papers.

Bioinformatics and Biology Insights
A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

Cancer Informatics
Introductory Editorial: Network and Pathway Analysis of Cancer Susceptibility (A)

Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology
Left Ventricular Involvement in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy - A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

Echocardiographic Predictors of Ventricular Tachycardia

Planning and Guidance of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy-Lead Implantation by Evaluating Coronary Venous Anatomy Assessed with Multidetector Computed Tomography

Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports
A Case of IgG4-Related Hypophysitis Presented with Hypopituitarism and Diabetes Insipidus

Clinical Medicine Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine
Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics
Normal Growth of Healthy Infants Born from HIV+ Mothers Fed a Reduced Protein Infant Formula Containing the Prebiotics Galacto-Oligosaccharides and Fructo-Oligosaccharides: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Environmental Health Insights
Introductory Editorial: Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene

Introductory Editorial: Disease Vectors

Evolutionary Bioinformatics
Extensive Genomic Variability of Knops Blood Group Polymorphisms Is Associated with Sickle Cell Disease in Africa

IVisTMSA: Interactive Visual Tools for Multiple Sequence Alignments


Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment
Sex-Related Differences in Self-Reported Neurocognitive Impairment among High-Risk Cocaine Users in Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Public Science Insights: Language changes during aging

Adults aged 60 and older are one of the largest growing populations in the world, and will double in number by 2050. During aging, individuals experience both physical and mental changes, with patterns of age-related changes varying by person. Common changes that older adults report are cognitive symptoms such as increased memory difficulties, and physical symptoms related to increasing age-related health issues such as heart problems and diabetes. These types of changes are likely familiar to older adults and their families, but there are other changes that come along with aging that may not be as obvious or well-known, but can be equally as important.

One area of change in thought processes during aging is language use and comprehension. In particular, pragmatic language abilities tend to decline during aging. Pragmatic language is the social use of language, and includes many different aspects of communication that are used every day. It includes verbal and nonverbal language aspects, such as staying on topic during conversation and eye contact, respectively. In addition, the different stresses placed on syllables and intonation are aspects of pragmatic language. It also includes the use and comprehension of metaphors, idioms, proverbs, sarcasm, and aspects of humor. Although not every individual will experience the same trajectory of changes, declines in these abilities can result in communication lapses or disconnection in social communication.

As we get older, pragmatic language ability can decline due to the aging of the mirrored halves of the brain, called cerebral hemispheres. In particular, pragmatic language abilities have been associated with the right cerebral hemisphere. This hemisphere is responsible for the synthesis of verbal and nonverbal information, among other functions. The left hemisphere is the more analytical processor, enabling the linguistic aspects of language such as words to be sequentially processed. The two hemispheres are joined by the brain's largest white matter tract, the corpus callosum, which allows these different types of language-related information to be relayed between both hemispheres.

Because older adults often find themselves having increasingly frequent visits to health care providers, patients' age-related pragmatic language changes can affect the patient-provider relationship. If there is a lapse in communication due to misunderstanding from pragmatic changes, important health-related information may not be relayed. Future research on pragmatic language changes in aging adults should focus on awareness programs for individuals and their families. In addition, continued education and training for health care providers about the age-related changes that can affect communication will be important for the growing number of older adults that providers will encounter.

Dr Rachel Messer is author of the recently published paper Pragmatic Language Changes During Normal Aging: Implications for Health Care, available for download now in Healthy Aging & Clinical Care in the Elderly.

Monday, March 9, 2015

Public Science Insights: Language changes during aging

Adults aged 60 and older are one of the largest growing populations in the world, and will double in number by 2050. During aging, individuals experience both physical and mental changes, with patterns of age-related changes varying by person. Common changes that older adults report are cognitive symptoms such as increased memory difficulties, and physical symptoms related to increasing age-related health issues such as heart problems and diabetes. These types of changes are likely familiar to older adults and their families, but there are other changes that come along with aging that may not be as obvious or well-known, but can be equally as important.

One area of change in thought processes during aging is language use and comprehension. In particular, pragmatic language abilities tend to decline during aging. Pragmatic language is the social use of language, and includes many different aspects of communication that are used every day. It includes verbal and nonverbal language aspects, such as staying on topic during conversation and eye contact, respectively. In addition, the different stresses placed on syllables and intonation are aspects of pragmatic language. It also includes the use and comprehension of metaphors, idioms, proverbs, sarcasm, and aspects of humor. Although not every individual will experience the same trajectory of changes, declines in these abilities can result in communication lapses or disconnection in social communication.

As we get older, pragmatic language ability can decline due to the aging of the mirrored halves of the brain, called cerebral hemispheres. In particular, pragmatic language abilities have been associated with the right cerebral hemisphere. This hemisphere is responsible for the synthesis of verbal and nonverbal information, among other functions. The left hemisphere is the more analytical processor, enabling the linguistic aspects of language such as words to be sequentially processed. The two hemispheres are joined by the brain's largest white matter tract, the corpus callosum, which allows these different types of language-related information to be relayed between both hemispheres.

Because older adults often find themselves having increasingly frequent visits to health care providers, patients' age-related pragmatic language changes can affect the patient-provider relationship. If there is a lapse in communication due to misunderstanding from pragmatic changes, important health-related information may not be relayed. Future research on pragmatic language changes in aging adults should focus on awareness programs for individuals and their families. In addition, continued education and training for health care providers about the age-related changes that can affect communication will be important for the growing number of older adults that providers will encounter.

Dr Rachel Messer is author of the recently published paper Pragmatic Language Changes During Normal Aging: Implications for Health Care, available for download now in Healthy Aging & Clinical Care in the Elderly.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Interview with Dr Taguchi

This author interview is by Dr Y-H Taguchi, of Chuo University. Dr Taguchi's full paper, Apparent microRNA-Target-specific Histone Modification in Mammalian Spermatogenesis, is available for download in Evolutionary Bioinformatics.

Please summarise for readers the content of your article.

I performed meta-analyses on publically available histone modification profiles in spermatogenesis. I found that how histone is modified is deeply related to how genes associated with histone modifications are targeted by microRNAs (miRNAs).

How did you come to be involved in your area of study?

In 2011, I started the research project, supported by KAKENHI grant, to computationally infer miRNA regulation of target genes based on only target gene expression. Subsequently I invented the method called MiRaGE, which was released as a package available in Bioconductor. When submitting an article using this methodology to the ICIC2012 conference, some reviewers advised me to consider promoter methylation together. Following their advice, I have found that how promoter is methylated is deeply related to how genes associated with promoter methylation are targeted by miRNAs (these have already been published as two research papers in 2013). After this, I came to the idea that any other epigenetic effects are also affected by how genes associated with specific epigenetic markers are targeted by miRNAs. Applying this idea to histone modification, I have found that it truly occurs.

What was previously known about the topic of your article?

To my knowledge, there have been no previous discussions about this effect. Thus, it is the first report about the collaboration between histone modification and being targeted by miRNAs.

How has your work in this area advanced understanding of the topic?

Although there was a lot of research focused on epigenetics, collaborations between distinct epigenetic effects was rarely discussed. Since histone modification takes place in nuclei while miRNA regulation of target genes occurs in cytoplasm, the collaboration between these two was hardly considered. However, it was recently reported that miRNA has many unknown functions other than target gene regulation in cytoplasm. For example, some miRNAs were reported to be localized in nuclei, too. However, there are no known functions of miRNAs in nuclei, at least in mammals. Thus, the present work may open the gate for research into the collaboration between miRNAs and histone modification as well as unknown functions of miRNAs in mammalian nuclei.

What do you regard as being the most important aspect of the results reported in the article?

Although histone modification is regarded to be very important, our knowledge about it is very limited. For example, in epigenetic therapy that is recently regarded to be promising strategy to cure cancers, histone modifications are supposed to play critical roles. In recent focus on the topic of transgenerational epigenetics, histone modification is one of promising heritable epigenetic features. Studying the collaboration between miRNAs and histone modification may lead us to understand these unknown roles of histone modification. Experimental confirmation of miRNA-target-specific histone modification is eagerly waited.

If you would like to include a link to a departmental webpage, LinkedIn profile, or other webpage where readers can learn more about your work paste it below:

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Y-h_Taguchi2

http://www.slideshare.net/yhtaguchi

Monday, March 2, 2015

Published During February

We are pleased to announce the publication of the following peer reviewed papers. Sign up to receive email alerts to receive immediate notification of new papers.

Advances in Tumor Virology
Chronic Inflammation in Cancer: The Role of Human Viruses

Analytical Chemistry Insights
Determination of Chlorophenoxy Acid Methyl Esters and Other Chlorinated Herbicides by GC High-resolution QTOFMS and Soft lionization

Biochemistry Insights
Production, Purification, and Identification of Cholest-4-en-3-one Produced by Cholesterol Oxidase from Rhodococcus sp. in Aqueous/Organic Biphasic System

Bioinformatics and Biology Insights
Identification and Expression Analysis of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Co-orthologs in Solanum lycopersicum

Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights
Future of Bone Repair

Cancer Informatics

Pathway-based Biomarkers for Breast Cancer in Proteomics

An Improved Version of Logistic Bayesian LASSO for Detecting Rare Haplotype-Environment Interactions with Application to Lung Cancer

Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Cancer Cells by Cell Contact and Adhesion

Evaluating Methods for Modeling Epistasis Networks with Application to Head and Neck Cancer

Extending Information Retrieval Methods to Personalized Genomic-Based Studies of Disease

Toolbox for Mobile-Element Insertion Detection on Cancer Genomes

Empirical Transition Probability Indexing Sparse-Coding Belief Propagation (ETPI-SCoBeP) Genome Sequence Alignment

sfDM: Open-Source Software for Temporal Analysis and Visualization of Brain Tumor Diffusion MR Using Serial Functional Diffusion Mapping

Mapping Splicing Quantitative Trait Loci in RNA-Seq

Introductory Editorial: Array Platform Modeling and Analysis (A)

Network Analysis of Circular Permutations in Multidomain Proteins Reveals Functional Linkages for Uncharacterized Proteins

What Tumor Dynamics Modeling Can Teach us About Exploiting the Stem-Cell View for Better Cancer Treatment

Comprehensive Evaluation of Composite Gene Features in Cancer Outcome Prediction

Clinical Medicine Insights: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders
Ultrasonographic Tendon Alteration in Relation to Parathyroid Dysfunction in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients.

Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

Predictive Factors Related to the Efficacy of Golimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis


The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review

Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology
Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 4 (FABP4): Pathophysiological Insights and Potent Clinical Biomarker of Metabolic and Cardiovascular Diseases

Clinical Utility of Exercise Training in Heart Failure with Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction

Echocardiographic Manifestation of Esophagitis Mimicking a Posterior Mediastinal Mass


Transpopliteal Balloon-Assisted Excimer-Laser Atherectomy for the Treatment of Chronic Femoropopliteal Occlusions: Feasibility and Initial Results


Characterizing Heart Failure in the Ventricular Volume Domain

Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports
A Case of Tuberculous Cellulitis

Biliary Stent Migration to Hepatic Duct-Case Report of a Late Complication

Three Adult Cases of HPV-B19 Infection with Concomitant Leukopenia and Low Platelet Counts

Life Threatening Hemoperitoneum and Liver Injury as a Result of Chest Tube Thoracostomy

Clinical Medicine Insights: Ear, Nose and Throat
Selective Neck Dissection (IIa, III): A Rational Replacement for Extended Supraomohyoid Neck Dissection in Patients with N0 Supraglottic and Glottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes
Unhealthy Weight Control Practices: Culprits and Clinical Recommendations

Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology
Intraperitoneal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma: Role of Chemotherapy and Bone Marrow Allotransplantation in Locally Advanced Disease?

Development of Interpretable Predictive Models for BPH and Prostate Cancer

Clinical Medicine Insights: Pediatrics
Intravenous Lipids for Preterm Infants: A Review

Cyclopia: A Rare Condition with Unusual Presentation - A Case Report

Decreased Plasma Myeloperoxidase Associated with Probiotic Therapy in Autistic Children

Clinical Medicine Insights: Urology
Advances in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Women

Environmental Health Insights
Evaluation of Pulmonary and Systemic Toxicity of Oil Dispersant (COREXIT EC9500A®) Following Acute Repeated Inhalation Exposure

Workplace Exercise for Control of Occupational Neck/Shoulder Disorders: A Review of Prospective Studies

Evolutionary Bioinformatics
windex: Analyzing Convergent Evolution Using the Wheatsheaf Index in R

A Novel Approach to Identify Candidate Prognostic Factors for Hepatitis C Treatment Response Integrating Clinical and Viral Genetic Data

Apparent microRNA-Target-specific Histone Modification in Mammalian Spermatogenesis

Healthy Aging & Clinical Care in the Elderly
Pragmatic Language Changes During Normal Aging: Implications for Health Care

Infectious Diseases: Research and Treatment
Lack of Correlation between Bristol Stool Scale and Quantitative Bacterial Load in Clostridium difficile Infection

International Journal of Tryptophan Research
The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Review of Its Role in the Physiology and Pathology of the Integument and Its Relationship to the Tryptophan Metabolism

Journal of Experimental Neuroscience
Molecular and Physiological Factors of Neuroprotection in Hypoxia-tolerant Models: Pharmacological Clues for the Treatment of Stroke

Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
Pedagogy Rules: Open Mindset in Adopting Fit-for-Purpose Educational Tools in Teaching Dispersed Medical Students

Student Perceived Value of Anatomy Pedagogy, Part I: Prosection or Dissection?

Student Perceived Value of Anatomy Pedagogy, Part II: Clinical Practice and Assessment

Palliative Care: Research and Treatment
Death in Long-term Care: A Brief Report Examining Factors Associated with Death within 31 Days of Assessment

Perspectives in Medicinal Chemistry
New Approaches to Treating Alzheimer's Disease

Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment
Gasoline Abuse in a 10-Year-Old Child with Mental Retardation: A Case Report

What is the Association of Cannabis Use and Cardiovascular Complications?

 

Friday, February 27, 2015

Published This Week (23rd February - 27th February)

We are pleased to announce the publication of the following peer reviewed papers.  Sign up to receive email alerts to receive immediate notification of new papers.

Cancer Informatics

What Tumor Dynamics Modeling Can Teach us About Exploiting the Stem-Cell View for Better Cancer Treatment

Comprehensive Evaluation of Composite Gene Features in Cancer Outcome Prediction

Clinical Medicine Insights: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders

The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review

Clinical Medicine Insights: Cardiology

Echocardiographic Manifestation of Esophagitis Mimicking a Posterior Mediastinal Mass

Transpopliteal Balloon-Assisted Excimer–Laser Atherectomy for the Treatment of Chronic Femoropopliteal Occlusions: Feasibility and Initial Results

Characterizing Heart Failure in the Ventricular Volume Domain

Clinical Medicine Insights: Case Reports

Three Adult Cases of HPV-B19 Infection with Concomitant Leukopenia and Low Platelet Counts

Life Threatening Hemoperitoneum and Liver Injury as a Result of Chest Tube Thoracostomy

Clinical Medicine Insights: Oncology

Development of Interpretable Predictive Models for BPH and Prostate Cancer

Clinical Medicine Insights: Urology

Advances in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Women

Environmental Health Insights

Workplace Exercise for Control of Occupational Neck/Shoulder Disorders: A Review of Prospective Studies

Evolutionary Bioinformatics

A Novel Approach to Identify Candidate Prognostic Factors for Hepatitis C Treatment Response Integrating Clinical and Viral Genetic Data

Apparent microRNA-Target-specific Histone Modification in Mammalian Spermatogenesis

Healthy Aging & Clinical Care in the Elderly

Pragmatic Language Changes During Normal Aging: Implications for Health Care

Infectious Diseases: Research and Treatment

Lack of Correlation between Bristol Stool Scale and Quantitative Bacterial Load in Clostridium difficile Infection

Journal of Experimental Neuroscience

Molecular and Physiological Factors of Neuroprotection in Hypoxia-tolerant Models: Pharmacological Clues for the Treatment of Stroke

Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development

Pedagogy Rules: Open Mindset in Adopting Fit-for-Purpose Educational Tools in Teaching Dispersed Medical Students

Student Perceived Value of Anatomy Pedagogy, Part I: Prosection or Dissection?

Student Perceived Value of Anatomy Pedagogy, Part II: Clinical Practice and Assessment